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Louis Têtu

Chairman and CEO

Louis Tetu is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Coveo. Prior to Coveo, Louis co-founded Taleo Corporation [NASDAQ: TLEO], the leading international provider of on-demand Internet software for talent and human capital management, acquired by Oracle for $1.9B in February 2012. Louis held the position of Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board of Directors from the company’s inception in 1999 through 2007. In 2004, Taleo was recognized as the 11th fastest growing technology company in the United States within the Deloitte Technology Fast 500, and in 2005 it was the only software company among the Inc. 500 winners to have an Initial Public Offering.

Prior to Taleo, Louis was President of Baan SCS, the supply-chain management solutions group of Baan, a global enterprise software company with more than 5,000 employees. This followed Baan’s acquisition of Berclain Group inc., which he co-founded in 1989 and where he served as president until 1996. Louis is an Engineering graduate from Laval University of Canada in 1985 and in 1997 was honored by Laval for his outstanding social contributions and business achievements. He also received the 2006 Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of The Year award in the Technology and Communication category.

Louis is also chairman of the Board of PetalMD, a developer of social platforms for the medical sector. Outside of his professional career, Louis is a private equity investor involved in technology and infrastructure projects within emerging countries, as well as a commercially licensed helicopter pilot.

Louis is also actively involved and on the Board of Educaide in Quebec, a foundation devoted to high school reinsertion for children from financially challenged families across Quebec. Louis lives in Quebec with his wife and their three children.


Author Archives



In 2014, Knowledge Management is an oxymoron!

Posted by Louis Têtu on February 18, 2014

Knowledge can’t be managed. Knowledge is everywhere, buried in the confines of the organization, within stovepipes of systems and silos, but also woven in the minds of people. In fact, it is people not systems who possess knowledge and decide on its relevance according to the context of what they are working on.

But knowledge is also paradoxically one of the most important assets of any organization, and an asset that will yield returns only when re-used, when the sum of each employee and customer can tap into what people know and the information that the company knows, every time. Read more and comment »


Return on Knowledge: The Next Big Source of Wealth Creation in a Big Data World

Posted by Louis Têtu on March 20, 2013

ROK eBookYou’ve seen us write many times in this blog about the knowledge-access challenges posed by Big Data and for two good reasons:

  1. Big, unstructured data, fragmented across an ever growing number of sources, is overwhelming organizations, requiring them to find new ways to access information in order to stay competitive, better serve their customers and bring more innovative products to market, faster.
  2. At the other end of the spectrum are customers who are increasingly knowledgeable and demanding a greater degree of immediacy and relevance towards their needs.
  3. Read more and comment »


What Trends Will Impact the Future of Customer Service?

Posted by Louis Têtu on March 29, 2012

I was recently asked this question during an interview with Jason Redlus, managing member and founder of the Argyle Executive Forum. We had a nice discussion about customer service organizations and the way they manage their information, knowledge, and people.

Our conversation around the future of customer service touched on so many different, salient points that I was prompted to open up the discussion to a broader audience. I am hoping you will contribute your thoughts. Read more and comment »


Knowledge Insight Means Big Money in Customer Service

Posted by Louis Têtu on October 3, 2011

As a rule of thumb in customer service, financial models show that any ticket not resolved quickly – due to lack of insight – will see its cost roughly triple. When you factor in research time to gain insight, contact and context re-establishment time, having to bring other people into the mix to resolve a problem, escalation time, time wasted  when an agent is interrupted by another agent looking for advice on yet another ticket, and more, you’ve got quite an inefficient, costly problem on your hands.

Worse – from the customer experience perspective – because of queues introduced in the process, case resolution time can easily increase 10x. For those of you who are familiar with manufacturing and Kanban principles, this is a very similar topology of problem. Every time a ticket is unresolved it introduces WIP and delays, driving the whole cycle-time up significantly. Read more and comment »