Blog Coveo Insights

Ask a Systems Integrator: What’s next in content personalization?

Posted by Diane Berry on October 23, 2013

When it comes to a brand’s online experience, personalization is the new mandate. But personalization goes beyond content creation and web content management – it requires advanced planning, strategy and forethought.

pezzanoTo discuss the state of online content personalization, we sat down with Paul Pezzano, chief operating officer of Bluetube, a full service digital agency and systems integrator that helps brands with their digital experience.

What is the biggest problem you see with a company’s web content? Read more and comment »

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A.I.M. Higher: Empower Your Service Reps to Delight Customers

Posted by Bob Thompson on February 14, 2013

CustomerThinkOn a trip to Orlando two years ago, I arrived quite late to a Hilton hotel and visited the restaurant a few minutes before closing. The server took my order, disappeared, and didn’t come back for a few minutes. It was just a touch too long, and I was beginning to wonder if my order was forgotten.

Then the server came back, apologized for the delay and gave me a free drink on the spot. I still remember that experience because it wasn’t expected. I had not complained and the delay really wasn’t a big deal. So far as I know, I didn’t send any signals via my body language that I was unhappy.

It impressed me that my server was empathetic enough to realize that their service was not quite up to par, without a complaint. And furthermore, he didn’t have to go ask permission to give me the drink. Read more and comment »

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How to Truly Listen to Your Customers – through Social Media and Enterprise Content

Posted by Diane Berry on October 30, 2012

I had the pleasure of attending a Forbes CMO Network event last month that highlighted the challenges and opportunities associated with a social business strategy. The presentation by Charlene Li of the Altimeter Group was directly in line with the key challenge many top marketers face today: how can marketing teams adapt to – and exceed – the needs of increasingly active (and vocal) online customers?

Most brands understand that engaging and supporting their consumers on social channels is important. However, I’d be curious to know how many leading brands are sure that they’re hearing the entire conversation. Companies have social media crawlers, managers and content aggregators, but how does that mass of dialogue make enough sense to translate into an actionable plan towards customer- centricity? How do they connect the overwhelming amounts of social chatter with actual customers, their history, products, levels of satisfaction? How do they understand the importance of a particular customer who is vocal on social media?

The answer comes with insight. If brands are able to tie social in with other valuable information – emails, CRM records, ERP records, databases, survey data on fileshares, etc. – then they can gain a clearer perception of the customer, in order to take the appropriate action. Once a clear picture is achieved, brands can truly practice a customer-centric marketing strategy because they’re sure about the challenges their customers are facing. Listening may seem like the easiest part of a social strategy on paper, but the execution of that strategy can be challenging. I ask other marketers: are you sure you’re seeing the entire scope of your customers’ perceptions, linked with what you already know about them? Read more and comment »

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R&D’s Greatest Challenge: Insight to Innovate

Posted by Diane Berry on August 9, 2012

Amid the excitement and athleticism of the Olympics, we have uncovered another interesting display of global competition.  And although it may not be as entertaining, the ramifications are more far-reaching. Specifically, the Global Innovation Index evaluates each country’s level of innovation over the past year, as judged by each country’s knowledge, technology and creative outputs. It was reported by the CEO of Eli Lily in a Forbes post about America’s declining ranking last month.

Regardless of which country is the most innovative, businesses all over the world are plagued by an “Insight Deficit” within their R&D departments. This is because engineers and developers generally don’t have access to the full breadth of information necessary to make informed decisions—product data, competitive insight, customer surveys and more. As a result, products take longer to get to market, production requires more re-dos, and competition may often seem one step ahead. Without easy assimilation of relevant and actionable insights, organizations aren’t as nimble or flexible as they could be.

Having better and immediate insight into data across systems and departments helps companies improve agility in their innovation, and to innovate “incrementally,” that is, building on each incremental innovation. They can understand more about what has occurred before—and why—plus incorporate feedback from customers, internal review teams. They can adjust processes and perhaps swap in new materials to improve each cycle of development. Overall, having more insight into these facets allows R&D departments to better justify the investments they make. Read more and comment »

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Survey says…what? Why customer surveys may not be the best approach

Posted by Ed Shepherdson on May 30, 2012

Customer Experience management is all the buzz now a days. The good news is that companies seem to be more and more genuine about paying attention to their clients’ needs. But are they taking the right approach of measuring their experiences through surveys?

In the late 90’s, the internet started to change the way people serviced their customers via self service portals and websites. Companies began to realize that their customers want to service themselves – on their time – they didn’t want to wait in phone queues to talk to people who sometimes didn’t have the answer. While online self-service sites gave clients the ability to service themselves quickly and on their schedule, the one thing that went missing was the feedback mechanism.

When people were talking to you on the phone you could very quickly tell whether they were happy or not. With online customer self-service, companies have less of a personal relationship with their customers. Thus the dawn of the whole market for customer surveys. Yes surveys have been around a long time, but their importance was certainly heightened by the internet revolution. Read more and comment »

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