Blog Coveo Insights

Opening up the Dropbox

Posted by Diane Berry on September 28, 2012

On our quest to empower employees to find the right insight every time, we often find that knowledge can come from anywhere. Moreover, with the consumerization of IT, employees are using many different systems which they can easily activate themselves, and start sharing with other employees.

One of those is Dropbox, a fast-growing online document repository that boasts 50 million users – double what it had last year. Dropbox has both end user and enterprise clients. When you can combine insights from Dropbox with emails, Twitter, Exchange, file systems consolidated into Coveo for Salesforce, which can also be activated by end users, then the possibilities for locating the right insight to win deals and serve customers get even better. Read more and comment »

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The “Intentional Approach” to Technology Adoption Part 6: Using Technology Adoption Theory

Posted by Trent Parkhill on May 6, 2011

Maximizing adoption requires understanding the motivations of different groups of users and tailoring your deployment messages and materials to address their perspectives. Technology adoption guru Geoffrey Moore suggests that the best way to drive broad adoption is to begin with the group at the top of this table, and as you succeed in achieving adoption within each group, use that group to help engage the next group in the table.

So, what are some of the ways we can use what we know about these groups to encourage them to adopt a new technology? And how do members of each group affect the other groups? Read more and comment »

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The “Intentional Approach” to Technology Adoption Part 5: Technology Adoption Theory

Posted by Trent Parkhill on May 2, 2011

Maximizing technology adoption requires understanding the motivations of different groups of users and tailoring your deployment messages and materials to address their perspectives. So what are these different groups of users and are they really so different?

Understanding how people choose and adopt new technology is critical.  This material is based on the Everett Rogers “diffusion of innovations theory” as adapted by Geoffrey Moore in “Crossing the Chasm.” Many people are familiar with this work as it is one of the basic models used in the marketing of software and hardware. What is different here is that I am proposing we can apply this understanding to improve the deployment of new technologies in our companies. Read more and comment »

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The “Intentional Approach” to Technology Adoption Part 4: Technology Should Address An Important Need and Be Tailored to the Business

Posted by Trent Parkhill on April 11, 2011

The third impediment to technology adoption is that adoption is hindered when the new system does not address an important need or the initial implementation is not sufficiently tailored to the business to be compelling. While these impediments apply to implementation of all new technologies, let’s use an enterprise search project to illustrate the point.

Addressing an Important Need Read more and comment »

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The “Intentional Approach” to Technology Adoption Part 3: Understand the Keys to Driving Adoption

Posted by Trent Parkhill on April 8, 2011

In my last blog post, I mentioned that by analyzing our past projects, we can improve adoption of our future information systems projects. This post will focus on the second impediment identified in this type of review: that adoption is hindered when we do not understand how to drive adoption.

After putting months of work into developing and debugging a new information system, we tend to put little thought and effort into the deployment and promotion of the system we have created. Our months of experience with the system may have convinced us that it is so easy to learn and such a great system that users will flock to it naturally, or our attention is now focused on possible integration issues. Or, perhaps we don’t know what steps to take. Whatever the reason, our mind is not focused on what it will take to drive full adoption, and we are at risk of having to settle for low initial adoption and a slow subsequent rate of adoption growth. Read more and comment »

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